Soliloquy of spanish cloister. Soliloquy Of The Spanish Cloister by Robert Browning 2022-10-22

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The "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" is a poem written by Robert Browning in 1842. It is a dramatic monologue, a literary form in which a character speaks to themselves or to a silent audience, revealing their inner thoughts and feelings.

In this particular soliloquy, the speaker is a Spanish monk who is speaking to himself in his cloister, or private chapel. The monk is bitter and resentful, and his soliloquy is filled with jealousy, anger, and a sense of superiority over his fellow monks.

The monk is jealous of Brother Lawrence, a fellow monk who is known for his humility and kindness. The speaker despises Brother Lawrence for his lack of intelligence and his lack of ambition, and he revels in the fact that he is superior to him in every way.

As the soliloquy progresses, the monk's jealousy and resentment become more and more evident. He speaks of the "curse-foiled, cross-crosslet fitchée" that he wishes upon Brother Lawrence, and he imagines all sorts of ways in which he could cause harm to his fellow monk.

Despite his negative feelings towards Brother Lawrence, the monk is also deeply insecure. He is constantly seeking validation and recognition from his superiors, and he is obsessed with the idea of being the best monk in the monastery.

In the end, the soliloquy reveals the monk to be a deeply flawed and unhappy individual, consumed by jealousy, anger, and a desire for superiority. Through his soliloquy, Browning has created a vivid and complex character, one who is both repugnant and pitiable, and whose inner thoughts and feelings are laid bare for all to see.

Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister Themes

soliloquy of spanish cloister

As you read line by line through the poem, look closely at what the narrator is saying, taking into account that the narrator is a monk. Because both operate in extreme realms, it is easy to make the jump. If he's able We're to have a feast! The turn that the poem takes in the seventh stanza, when the speaker begins to consider hell as an option, moves the poem into a starker comment on hypocrisy. The narrator's character is revealed throughout the poem by his attitude towards Brother Lawrence. The form allows the monk to take on many voices in the same way Browning is crafting his voice. By taking on Brother Lawrence's voice, the speaker is able to justify his otherwise-ungrounded hatred, even while the more he rationalizes, the more we as readers are confronted with the dramatic irony that the speaker lacks any objective justification. Gr-r-r — you swine! We'll have our Laid with care on our own shelf! And trying to tempt other monks with it? The third stanza follows with the speaker taking the Brother's voice, snidely mocking what he perceives as Brother Lawrence's love of good food and unwillingness to eat anything sub-par.

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Robert Browning’s Poetry “Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister” Summary & Analysis

soliloquy of spanish cloister

In the seventh stanza, the speaker moves to darker territory as he realizes that a "text in Galatians" explains how a sinner will sin progressively more and be damned for it. I the Trinity illustrate, Drinking watered orange pulp — In three sips the Arian frustrate; While he drains his at one gulp! Or, my scrofulous French novel, On grey paper with blunt type! He snaps out of Brother Lawrence's voice as he sees the latter break a flower he is watering, which the speaker mocks to himself. Form The poem comprises nine eight-line stanzas, each rhyming ABABCDCD. Gr-r-r-there go, my heart's abhorrence! He dropped out of the University of London and struggled with his first publications. Besides, having your own goblet is simply the sign of a civilised person, in our view, especially in an age before Fairy washing-up liquid.

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Robert Browning: Poems “Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister” Summary and Analysis

soliloquy of spanish cloister

Simply glance at it, you grovel Hand and foot in Belial's gripe: If I double down its pages At the woeful sixteenth print, When he gathers his greengages, Ope a sieve and slip it in't? Plena gratia 72 Ave, Virgo! Robert Browning's "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" is a darkly funny story of hatred, hypocrisy, and self-deception. If hate killed men, Brother Lawrence, God's blood, would not mine kill you! Taking God's name in vain wishing to kill someone by force of hatred rather than turning the other cheek are both unchristian. First, while this poem is grouped as one of Browning's dramatic monologues, it is not technically a monologue but instead a soliloquy, a speech where the speaker shares his inner thoughts. In the fifth stanza, he accuses Brother Lawrence of failing to show proper piety through ridiculous gestures like crossing his fork and knife in the shape of a cross or drinking in three gulps to imitate the Trinity. There his lily snaps! So much amazing literature is quickly cast aside. Hell dry you up with its flames! While brown Dolores Squats outside the Convent bank With Sanchicha, telling stories, Steeping tresses in the tank, Blue-black, lustrous, thick like horsehairs, —Can't I see his dead eye glow, Bright as 'twere a Barbary corsair's? Plena gratiâ Ave, Virgo! Water your damned flower-pots, do! The lines fall roughly into tetrameter, although with some irregularities. Again, why should a monk want someone to suffer in Hell merely for tending a garden? The speaker imagines asking about the flowers, which Brother Lawrence presumably confesses are not doing well, and then the speaker reveals that he's been sabotaging their progress.

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Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister

soliloquy of spanish cloister

GradeSaver, 27 January 2013 Web. We'll have our platter burnished, Laid with care on our own shelf! The irony, of course, is that the novel is his — he has already corrupted his owl soul, and now seeks to corrupt another. I the In VI. It is abundantly clear to the reader that the speaker knows only the outward shapes of Christianity, whereas the true meanings of the religion — charity, love, and forgiveness — are absent from his character. So absent are they that the speaker is willing not only to damn Brother Lawrence to an eternity in hell, but also to damn himself. Hy, Zy, Hine 71'St, there's Vespers! When he Cross-wise, to my recollection, As do I, in Jesu's praise. With a fire-new spoon we're furnished, And a goblet for ourself, Rinsed like something sacrificial Ere 'tis fit to touch our chaps— Marked with L.

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A Short Analysis of Robert Browning’s ‘Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister’

soliloquy of spanish cloister

I must hear Wise talk of the kind of weather, Sort of season, time of year: Not a plenteous cork crop: scarcely Dare we hope oak-galls, I doubt; What's the Latin name for "parsley"? How go on your flowers? The speaker is so convinced of his own piety that he considers damnation an appropriate punishment for he who fails in it. In the second stanza, the speaker thinks of how when the monks have dinner together, Brother Lawrence engages in pleasantries, "wise talk of the kind of weather," and how such activity angers him. If he's able We're to have a feast! That is, if he'd let it show! In the fourth stanza, the speaker thinks about how Brother Lawrence is coveting two women who sit nearby talking. Cite this page as follows: "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister - Themes and Meanings" Critical Guide to Poetry for Students Ed. With a fire-new And a Rinsed like Ere 'tis fit to Marked with L. How go on your flowers? See eNotes Ad-Free Start your 48-hour free trial to get access to more than 30,000 additional guides and more than 350,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts.

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Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister Poem Summary and Analysis

soliloquy of spanish cloister

This poem gives the sour-natured attitude of mind of a monk jealous of a brother, whom he hates merely because of his genial nature and goodness. Water your damned flowerpots, do! As his fantasy escalates, the vesper bells ring and the speaker angrily ceases his hateful imaginings to report for prayer. How go on your flowers? What's more, he admits to himself that Brother Lawrence does not "show" his lust, suggesting it is only the speaker's lust that fuels the attack. If hate killed men, Brother Lawrence, God's blood, would not mine kill you! Gr-r-r---there go, my heart's abhorrence! II At the meal we sit together; Salve tibi! His hatred for Brother Lawrence is so great that, if hate alone without acting on it could kill, his hatred would kill his fellow monk. If hate God's blood, What? However, by now we get the impression that the fault lies with the speaker more than it does with Brother Lawrence himself. Or, my On grey Simply Hand and foot in Belial's gripe: If I At the When he Ope a IX. The words are listed in the order in which they appear in the poem.

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Soliloquy Of The Spanish Cloister by Robert Browning

soliloquy of spanish cloister

Presenting himself as the model of righteousness, the speaker condemns a fellow monk, Brother Lawrence, for his immorality; but we soon recognize that the faults he assigns to Lawrence are in fact his own. He died the same day his Asolando was published. Or, my scrofulous French novel On grey paper with blunt type! Opening on a famous Dramatic Lyrics 1842 , one volume of his important eight-book collection Bells and Pomegranates. The Trinity is the belief that God, Jesus, and the Holy Ghost are all one spirit, whereas Arianism rejects this idea and sees Jesus as separate from, and subordinate to, God. Certainly, Browning does not mean to suggest that all priests are as deeply hypocritical as this speaker, or that we are all so wicked, but he does suggest through this masterful sketch how adept any individual can be at justifying his own subjective truth, and how the complications of our psychology often work against us by allowing us such license to rationalize our otherwise-ungrounded feelings and actions. There's a voice even within the voice Browning crafts, all of which suggests how deeply our psychology can work in order to defend our subjective truths.

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How does Browning reveal the narrator's character in Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister?

soliloquy of spanish cloister

Even when he thinks of the presumably lewd French novel as a way to ensnare Brother Lawrence, he ironically reveals his own knowledge of the book. The citation above will include either 2 or 3 dates. Not one fruit-sort can you spy? As with most of Browning's characters, what comes across most of all is the human complications of psychology, whereas institutions like religion are thin disguises of these more ordinary emotions. Oh, that rose has prior claims — Needs its leaden vase filled brimming? In the second stanza, he mocks Brother Lawrence's dinner-time comments, in the third stanza he takes on Lawrence's voice to suggest his love of material objects, and in the sixth he imagines a conversation with him. This gives the rhythm of the poem a forceful, direct feel, to echo the headlong anger of the monk who speaks. Hell dry you up with its flames! With Sanchicha, Blue-black, lustrous, ---Can't I see his dead eye glow, Bright as 'twere a That is, if he'd let it show! Perhaps most importantly, the speaker describes a bargain he would make with Satan to hurt Lawrence. The second is the date of publication online or last modification online.

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Robert Browning

soliloquy of spanish cloister

How go on your flowers? There his lily snaps! I the Trinity illustrate, Drinking watered orange-pulp— In three sips the Arian frustrate; While he drains his at one gulp. Herein is a commentary on the malleability of human psychology and our ability for rationalization. Plena grati Ave, Virgo! In the speaker's eyes, Brother Lawrence is the worst of men. Certainly, it's full of both dramatic irony and comments on serious themes like most of Browning's dramatic monologues, but the speaker's emotions and mode of address are so heightened that it's obviously meant to amuse as much as inform. Implicitly, it reveals the thin line between religious piety and hellish damnation. In this second stanza, our initial suspicions are confirmed: the speaker who harbours such hate towards Brother Lawrence is apparently consumed by petty anger, and dislikes the way he has to listen to his fellow monk chattering on over dinner about the weather, and about the things he is growing in the garden.

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